Story of Gratitude

I’m not the traditional Southern girl.  I didn’t get married after college, buy a house, and have kids.  Not that this progression is wrong, it isn’t. I would still love to get married and have kids. Buying a house is optional. I’ve learned valuable financial and mechanical lessons living with a homeowner.  (It’s stinkin’ hard to own a house!) Yes, I am not the traditional Southern girl and that’s okay. Actually, it’s more than okay. I suppose I am drawn to the non-traditional travelers because it's where my story begins – a messy family, hard chapters, and a lengthy process of finding my way through a wilderness marred by abuse and a fractured heart, now healing. Everyone has a story. Put another way, everyone’s life is a story.  And when your life isn’t the same as the traditional, you ask yourself a lot of hard questions.  Is my story less? Or, more often, am I less?   Some of the most inspiring stories are weaved together through a delicate orchestration of broken dreams, unexpected adventures, and beautiful second chances.   I ran across an article of fellow non-traditional traveler, Shannon.  Her story of gratitude is the stuff of big ol’ grace and wonder. Barren from the age of 21, in sadness Shannon convinced herself she did not want children. Until, that is, she befriended a young woman who one day asked her, “Will you adopt me?” Now single and in her mid-forties she was faced with an unexpected invitation to be a mother to a young woman of 20.  She accepted. Shannon’s story isn’t traditional or typical but it sure isn’t less. If we come to know our story and then give it away, we will discover the deepest meaning in our lives.  Shannon knew that. She engaged her story and experienced the joy of motherhood flood the brokenness of her youth. Are you a non-traditional stuck questioning your worth? Your story? Read about Shannon. Be inspired. Be challenged.  And boldly write another chapter of your story.  
I’m not the traditional Southern girl.  I didn’t get married after college, buy a house, and have kids.  Not that this progression is wrong, it isn’t. I would still love to get married and have kids. Buying a house is optional. I’ve learned valuable financial and mechanical lessons living with a homeowner.  (It’s stinkin’ hard to own a house!) Yes, I am not the traditional Southern girl and that’s okay. Actually, it’s more than okay. I suppose I am drawn to the non-traditional travelers because it’s where my story begins – a messy family, hard chapters, and a lengthy process of finding my way through a wilderness marred by abuse and a fractured heart, now healing. Everyone has a story. Put another way, everyone’s life is a story.  And when your life isn’t the same as the traditional, you ask yourself a lot of hard questions.  Is my story less? Or, more often, am I less?   Some of the most inspiring stories are weaved together through a delicate orchestration of broken dreams, unexpected adventures, and beautiful second chances.   I ran across an article of fellow non-traditional traveler, Shannon.  Her story of gratitude is the stuff of big ol’ grace and wonder. Barren from the age of 21, in sadness Shannon convinced herself she did not want children. Until, that is, she befriended a young woman who one day asked her, “Will you adopt me?” Now single and in her mid-forties she was faced with an unexpected invitation to be a mother to a young woman of 20.  She accepted. Shannon’s story isn’t traditional or typical but it sure isn’t less. If we come to know our story and then give it away, we will discover the deepest meaning in our lives.  Shannon knew that. She engaged her story and experienced the joy of motherhood flood the brokenness of her youth. Are you a non-traditional stuck questioning your worth? Your story? Read about Shannon. Be inspired. Be challenged.  And boldly write another chapter of your story.  

 

photo credit: http://www.yogaanonymous.com

 

One comment

  1. This is why I admire you so. I was going through a difficult, stressful time when I first began to get to know you. I was helping a friend through a personal crisis, and at the same time I was questioning myself, my life, going through my own mid-life crisis. And then there was you. From you I felt acceptance and kindness, even as you encouraged me to stretch myself. I needed your kind words; they were like “apples of gold in settings of silver.” You are an incredible woman, and I’m glad that God has caused our paths to cross.

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